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Office 365: Office Download Instructions

Office download instructions for PC or Mac!

Start this process on the computer you intend to install Office!

1. Sign in to your Office 365/WUmail account.
2. Be sure your browser is full screen.
3. Click on ‘Office 365’ in top left next to the Apps Launcher (“Waffle”).

4. On right, click on Install Office.

5. Click Office 365 apps.

6. Click Save File (or Close, depending on which browser you are using).

7. Follow the on screen instructions to complete the installation.
8. You have 5 licenses to use on personal devices.

To see the status of your licenses:

  1. Go to Outlook in Office 365, and click on your name in the top right corner, and click on ‘My Account‘.
  2. On the left, click on ‘Apps and devices’.
  3.  Click on the carot to the right of DEVICES, view and manage your installs.

HelpDesk: Main: 610-499-1047
Delaware: 302-477-2221
Harrisburg: 717-541-1927

Main Campus Residence Hall “Xfinity on Campus”

Due to a major shift to streaming technologies, as of July 1st, ITS will be taking on the responsibilities to provide cable TV to the Main Campus Residence Halls. Our Operations Department has done an outstanding job in the past, dealing with the logistical nightmare of handling over 1000 coax cables, remote controls, and set top boxes. We are excited to announce a new service that eliminates all of that!

XFINITY ON CAMPUS™

LIVE AND ON-DEMAND STREAMING TV AND DVR POWERED BY COMCAST

XFINITY On Campus™ is a service from Comcast enabling students to watch and record live television or to watch on-demand content directly in a web browser or mobile device with the Xfinity Stream app. The service is provided free as part of Widener University Main Campus Residence Life. For Television Sets, students must purchase a Roku player, from an authorized dealer, listed in details below.

KEY FEATURES

  • Watch over one hundred HD television channels with searchable program guide.
  • Twenty hours of Comcast DVR. Schedule recording of up to two programs simultaneously and then play them back at any time. Recorded shows can optionally be downloaded to watch off-campus or entirely off-line.
  • Watch thousands of XFINITY On-Demand programs at any time.
  • Optional premium upgrades to add channels, premium networks (including HBO, NFL RedZone and more), sports packages, and international programming.
  • TV Go / TV Everywhere supported for viewing when on-line but NOT on the campus network.
  • Direct access to Comcast to report problems and get help via the Comcast XFINTY on Campus™ portal.

ELIGIBILITY

XFINITY On Campus™ is available to officially enrolled Widener University Main Campus Housing residents only. There are no fees or complicated registration steps required to use the service. Your computer or mobile device must be connected to the Widener Main Campus network to use most features.

Minimum Requirements

  • Exclusively for residents of Widener University Main Campus Housing.
  • Widener user ID and password
  • Active connection on the campus network (wired or wireless)
  • Current versions of Windows and Mac OS X Operating System
  • Current versions of Apple iOS and Android devices
  • Current versions of select Kindle Fire devices
  • Roku Player (or Roku enabled smart TV) to watch on a television set

For more information visit MyWidener and search for Cable TV.

Comcast also provides more information at https://support.xfinityoncampus.com/hc/en-us.

If you are having problems, please contact the ITS Help Desk at (610)499-1047 or submit aquick ticket

 

WiFi Security Upgrade

Widener University is implementing a new authentication method and encryption for wireless devices. This security enhancement will help validate and ensure authorized access to our Widener University network while keeping your data safe.

The new authentication method will be rolled out on Wednesday June 10th. The NEW WIRELESS NETWORK NAMES (SSID) will appear for use across all 3 campuses. Here is a quick overview on the networks that you will see in certain areas of campus:

The “wu-secure” network is a secure encrypted network providing access to campus resources for all users with valid Widener IDs and passwords. Only encryption-capable devices will work on the wu-secure network. Use this network for all official University business when you are on campus. Windows 10, Mac OS 10.4+, and recent versions of Linux/Unix should all work on this network. Most mobile devices with Wi-Fi will also work. This network will be in all academic, administrative, and non-residential social areas on each campus.

The “wu-secure-resnet” network is a secure encrypted network providing internet access in our resident hall buildings. This network is only for encryption-capable devices. Windows Vista and later, Mac OS 10.4+, and recent versions of Linux/Unix should all work on this network. Most mobile devices with Wi-Fi will also work. This network will be in all Residential Halls on the Chester Main Campus and Delaware Campus.

Not all devices support the encryption software. Because of this, we have created a separate network for these devices called “wu-open-game-stream” wireless network. This will be used for the registration of gaming systems, TVs, and streaming devices (Roku, Firesticks, etc). Some older machines that do not support encryption will also be redirected to this network.

After the update, you will be prompted to enter your Widener LoginID and password to gain access to the university wireless network. When prompted, accept the certificate. Be sure you accept the certificate. If you do not accept the certificate you will not be able to log into the wu-secure or wu-secure-resnet network.

Since these new secure networks are authenticated with your login credentials, you will need to reenter your loginID and password when prompted after changing your password through Password Self Service. If you are not prompted to reenter your login information, you will need to “Forget the Network” and then Reconnect to get the prompt to appear.

For further instructions and FAQs, please utilize https://my.widener.edu and search wireless for further instructions on how access the network for your specific devices for access.

If you experience any issues connecting to the secure network; or just have questions or concerns, please contact the Widener University IT HelpDesk at 610-499-1047 or submit a ticket at https://quickticket.widener.edu.

 

PHISHING Awareness: [EXTERNAL:] Email Subject Tagging

Phishing is among the top security concerns for Information Technology. Personal identifiable information, the primary target of phishing attempts, falling into the wrong hands can cause both financial and reputation damage to our university, students and its employees. Phishing attacks are often launched by including malicious attachments or links in email. When recipients open these malicious attachments or click on the links, it can spark an attack. Most email scams begin with messages from an external email system.

As part of Widener University’s effort to reduce phishing and other email scams and spoofing, these external email messages will now receive an [External:] tag in the message subject. [External:] email tagging makes it as easy as possible for you to recognize phishing attempts wherever you can.

Avoid being scammed

The best defense to avoid being scammed is to be suspicious of any message asking for sensitive information. If the message seems off, it probably is. Trust your instincts. Phishing attempts can be clever, but they’re easy to avoid if you know the signs.

What is [External:] tagging and how does it work?

Most email scams begin with messages from a non-Widener (external) email system. When tagging is enabled these external email messages will now receive an [EXTERNAL:] tag in the message subject. Many safe and legitimate email messages come from external email systems. The [EXTERNAL:] tag does not mean the message is a scam or malicious, only that recipients should take caution and read carefully. All email originating from outside the university, except for approved services, will be tagged with this [EXTERNAL:] message. See sample below:

What should I do when I see an [External:] email?

It’s important to note that an email message with this warning does not necessarily mean the email is malicious, only that the recipient should take caution before clicking any links or attachments included within the email. The [EXTERNAL:] tag means you need to stop and think about this email:

  • Is it from a sender you know?
  • Were you expecting the email?
  • Verify with your friend or co-worker over the phone if you are unsure or if the email seems a bit off.
  • If there is a link in the message, Don’t click it! Instead, hover over the link to verify it is legitimate, or manually enter the known good URL into your browser.
  • Does the message make sense?
  • If you are concerned and unsure, send the message to Phish@widener.edu

Note: A legitimate message would not ask you to provide your credentials to maintain your account access.

Novell (OES) Retiring

 

Starting July 1st, Novell (OES) file and print sharing, more commonly called J drive or L drive,  will no longer be available.  For those who have not yet migrated to Active Directory (who log in to your computer via “computer logon only”),  ITS has come up with a list of questions to help you log into your computer, once we are back on campus.  Please review the questions below, and if you are still having difficulties logging in, please contact the HelpDesk.

Q: How do I login? 

At the OES prompt instead of logging in through OES you will choose computer only logon under the boxes for your username and password.  *If you changed your email password during the time you were away from campus you must use your old password to login.  Please see this link for directions. 

Q: Why won’t my new password work? 

If you changed your email (network) password while out of the office and you haven’t been migrated to Active Directory yet, the local password on your workstation did not change. You will need to enter your old email password.  If you do not remember your old email password please call the HelpDesk at x1047.  

Q: Can I still access my network drives? 

No, access to network drives will not be available.  All departmental data was migrated to  OneDrive and should be accessed through the OneDrive App in Office 365. 

Q: How do I print?  My printer won’t work anymore. 

Your old network printer is no longer available In order to print, you must install your printer again from the new print server.  Instructions to do so are available below,  or you can open a QuickTicket for assistance. 


Q: How do I remove or can I remove my printers that no longer work? 

You can remove printers that no longer work by going to your printer list and first, deselect the checkbox next to “Let Windows manage my default printer”.  Next, select the ‘<printername>on IPP://gutenberg.widener.edu’ device, click on it, then click on ‘remove device’. Confirm the deletion.  Be careful not to delete the printer with an ENZO name in it. 

Q: How can I get my computer updated to be on Active Directory? 

Once we are back on campus we will resume migrating computers to Active Directory. If you have returned to campus please open a QuickTicket to request an appointment to have your computer migrated. 

Introducing the new ITS HelpDesk QuickTicket

With the move to a new platform, the new HelpDesk QuickTicket comes with many improvements.  The new site will be  accessible from the same link you know at quickticket.widener.edu.  QuickTicket will be hosted on Microsoft Forms.  With this new site we are able to perform additional tasks on the back-end.  One task is we are able to assign incident tickets directly to the team responsible for a faster resolution.  This platform is mobile friendly.  Below is a the comparison between the new and old sites.  (Click image to enlarge)


Click image to enlarge

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month wraps up

Protect IT! Final tips for keeping your data safe

It’s essential to take proactive measures to enhance cybersecurity at home, on campus, at work, and when you’re out and about. In previous weeks, we addressed how to best own and secure your personal information. Now, we need to safeguard all of that invaluable data.

 

If You Connect, You Must Protect

Turn on automatic updates, if you can, and protect your devices with antivirus software.

Stay Protected While Connected

Before you connect to any public wireless hotspot – like at an airport, hotel, coffee shop or café – confirm the name of the network and exact login procedures with appropriate staff. Avoid sensitive activities (e.g., banking) that require passwords or credit cards.  If you just can’t avoid it, try to use a VPN (Virtual Private Network) connection, whether it’s provided by your employer or one you pay monthly for yourself.

If You Collect It, Protect It

If you’re involved in collecting data for or about people, it’s important that you treat it with care. It is vital that organizations of all sizes take measures to keep customer/consumer data and information safe.

 

Thanks for reading!  As always, if you ever have a question about any computer or device, please call the Helpdesk at x1047, or email at helpdesk@widener.edu.  If you get a phishing or questionable email, please forward it to phish@widener.edu.

Stay secure during National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

Secure IT! New info for a secure October

It‘s true: bad guys are getting better at stealing personal information from unsuspecting victims. But all is not lost; taking a few proactive steps can help to improve your account and device security. Here are the key messages to “Secure IT.”

 

Shake Up Your Passphrase Protocol

Passphrases can be inconvenient, but they’re important if you want to keep your information safe. Here are some simple ways to secure your accounts through better passphrase practices.

  • Make your passphrase a sentence: A strong passphrase is a sentence that is at least 12 characters long. Focus on positive sentences or phrases that you like to think about and are easy to remember (for example, “I love country music.”). On many sites, you can even use spaces!
  • Unique account, unique passphrase: Having separate passphrases for every account helps to thwart cybercriminals. At a minimum, separate your work and personal accounts and make sure that your critical accounts have the strongest passphrases.
  • Write it down and keep it safe: Everyone can forget a passphrase. Keep a list that’s stored in a safe, secure place away from your computer. You can alternatively use a service like a passphrase manager to keep track of your passphrase.

Double Your Login Protection

Enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) to ensure that the only person who has access to your account is you. Use it for email, banking, social media, and any other service that requires logging in. If MFA is an option, enable it by using a trusted mobile device, such as your smartphone, an authenticator app, or a secure token—a small physical device that can hook onto your key ring.  Who’s offering multi-factor?  Check out a list of services here. (link)

Shop Safe Online

  • Conduct research: When using a new website for purchases, read reviews and see if other consumers have had a positive or negative experience with the site.
  • When in doubt, throw it out: Links in emails, posts and texts are often how cybercriminals try to steal your information or infect your devices.
  • Personal information is like money: value it and protect it: When making a purchase online, be alert to the kinds of information being collected to complete the transaction. Make sure you think it is necessary for the vendor to request that information. Remember, you only need to fill out required fields at checkout.
  • Use safe payment options: Credit cards are generally the safest option because they allow buyers to seek a credit from the issuer if the product isn’t delivered or isn’t what was ordered.
  • Protect your $$: When shopping, check to be sure the site is security enabled. Look for web addresses with “https:// indicating extra measures to help secure your information.

Always Play Hard To Get With Strangers

A malicious email can look just like it comes from a financial institution, an e-commerce site, a government agency – or even Widener University. It often urges you to act quickly, “because your account has been compromised,” “your order cannot be fulfilled” or there is another urgent matter to address. If you are unsure whether an email request is legitimate, try to verify it with these steps:

  • Contact the company directly – using information provided on an account statement, on the company’s official website or on the back of a credit card.
  • Search for the company online – but not with information provided in the email.
  • Pay attention to the website’s URL – Malicious websites may look identical to a legitimate site, but the URL may use a variation in spelling or a different domain (e.g., .com versus .net).
  • Read Between the Lines – Is the message to you, or to “valued customer?”  Are you the only one in the “TO:” line?  These are common red flags for phishing emails.

As always, if you ever have a question about any computer or device, please call the Helpdesk at x1047, or email at helpdesk@widener.edu.  If you get a phishing or questionable email, please forward it to phish@widener.edu.

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month Continues

More tips for National Cybersecurity Awareness Month – Own IT!

Internet-based devices are everywhere in our lives: at home, school, work and on the go. An “always-on” network gives us ways to create, connect, and share, but also presents opportunities for cybersecurity threats that can compromise our most sensitive personal information.

This week we look at some of the ways to help keep us and our information safe. Here are the key messages to “Own IT.”

Never Click and Tell: staying safe on social media

Share With Care – remember that what you post – if you let it – goes to the whole world.

  • What you post can last a lifetime: Before posting online, think about what others might learn about you and who might see it in the future – teachers, parents, colleges and potential employers. Share the best of yourself online.
  • Be aware of what’s being shared: Be aware that when you post a picture or video online, you may also be sharing information about others or personal details about yourself like where you live, go to school or hang out.
  • Post only about others as you would like to have them post about you: The golden rule applies online as well. Ask permission before you tag a friend in a photo.
  • Own your online presence: It’s OK to limit who can see your information and what you share. Learn about and use privacy and security settings on your favorite online games, apps and platforms.

Keep Tabs on Your Apps: best practices for apps on your devices

  • Always lock your phone! If your phone gets lost or stolen, the first line of defense is a good lock.  Whether that’s a few numbers, a swipe pattern, or your fingerprint, always put something between your data and someone trying to get to it – and set it to auto-lock when you put it down.
  • Think twice if an app wants permission to use personal information (like your location) it doesn’t need before you say “OK.”
  • Pay attention to how much access the app wants – does it want access to your camera?  To your contacts list?  To your file system?  If so, why?  Does a game really need your camera or access to the people you know?  Make sure the app has a good reason for asking.
  • Always use approved app stores for your apps.  It’s not perfect, but apps from Apple and Google get checked for scams, viruses, malware far more  than anywhere else.

Update Privacy Settings on your phone and on social

Mobile devices – including smartphones, laptops and wearables – are always within reach everywhere we go, and they share a lot of information about us and our habits.  Check this link out to learn how to update your privacy settings on your phone and on the most popular online services to keep better control of your info: Managing Your Privacy

Our devices are a part of our lives, and it’s up to us to use them safely.  If you ever have a question about any computer or device, please call the Helpdesk at x1047, or email at helpdesk@widener.edu.  If you get a phishing or questionable email, please forward it to phish@widener.edu.

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month Begins

It’s National Cybersecurity Awareness Month again!

Every year, the National Cyber Security Alliance designates the month of October to remind us: STOP. THINK. CONNECT.™  With phishing threats and online scams already in full swing, it’s more important than ever to stay alert and show #cyberpride.  This year, there are three main messages for the month:

  • Own IT.

    • Never Click and Tell: staying safe on social media
    • Update Privacy Settings on your phone and on social
    • Keep Tabs on Your Apps: best practices for apps on your devices
  • Secure IT.

    • Shake Up Your Passphrase Protocol: create strong, unique passphrases
    • Double Your Login Protection: turn on multi-factor authentication
    • Shop Safe Online: making sure your purchases are secure
    • Play Hard To Get With Strangers: how to spot and avoid phish
  • Protect IT.

    • If You Connect, You Must Protect: updating to the latest security software, web browser and operating systems
    • Stay Protected While Connected: Wi-Fi safety
    • If You Collect It, Protect It: keeping personal information safe

 

In the upcoming weeks, we’ll explore each of these these further.  The bad guys are always changing their tactics, and trying every way they can – phishing emails, ads on websites, even texts on our smartphones – to trick us.  Keeping up a layered defense is our best approach.

If you ever have a question about an email, please forward it to phish@widener.edu. You can also call the Helpdesk at x1047, or email at helpdesk@widener.edu. And be sure to follow us on Twitter at @WidenerISO. Happy October, and safe computing!

 

macOS Catalina Released

Hold off on upgrading – Apple’s latest macOS raises concerns.

Apple’s latest release, macOS Catalina (10.15), has what Apple admits are “major issues” and we have a variety of concerns. As with most OS releases, we strongly recommend that you wait and not upgrade your University-owned Mac. Information Technology Services cannot yet support Catalina on University-owned Macs until several issues have been resolved, followed by further testing. (As a general rule, waiting until the first set of OS updates are released allows Apple to fix initial stability problems and bugs before the OS even makes it to your machine.)

While there are some interesting new features in this OS, like SideCar, Catalyst, increased security, and Apple Arcade, there are a number of things that either just won’t work or will present problems.  Here are the big ones we know so far:

Music Apps and the Death of iTunes

In macOS Catalina, Apple has done away with the iTunes app, splitting its features into three separate apps: Music, Podcasts, and TV (coming later this fall). If you do any kind of audio mixing or heavy music work using iTunes and third-party software, you will likely run into problems. The underlying XML database and associated XML file no longer exist to index a local music collection. This has “broken” a number of music tools, such as Traktor and Rekordbox.

Other Affected Software and Services

It’s not just music applications that are having issues.  A number of creative tools—including Apple Aperture, Microsoft Office 2011 and Adobe CS6—are experiencing issues. Network printing, along with local printing, may also stop working in the new environment.

VLab (Citrix) may not work in the new Catalina OS. Students could experience issues accessing VLab if they upgrade their personal laptops.

ExamSoft’s Examplify requires a specific update. ExamSoft support reported that “Examplify 2.0.6 is being released via silent and prompted update. Please note that the automatic update will not work for any exam takers who have already upgraded to macOS Catalina. These users will need to download the new version and manually install it.” If you already updated to macOS Catalina (10.15) and are experiencing issues, please verify you are using Examplify version 2.0.6.

SPSS Statistics will be affected by several changes in the new OS, some of which could cause it to stop working completely. Version 23 (and all versions prior) will not run at all. Increased data protection will block all versions of SPSS from accessing the following data sources: Documents, Downloads, Desktop, and any connected external disks (this includes USB drives). Mandatory notarized applications and the end of support for 32-bit applications (like the SPSS License Authorization Wizard) are other factors that need to be addressed.

Apple’s own ‘Reminders’ app can behave strangely if you have multiple devices. If you want reminders synced across your devices, they all need to be running the latest versions of their respective operating systems—for some reason there’s no mix and match of platforms. And it’s not just syncing that’s the issue, user data is being lost as well.

It’s a 64-bit Only World

Catalina also drops support for 32-bit applications. They just won’t run on this version of macOS. Most people can’t tell which apps are 32-bit and which are 64-bit. Even some 64-bit software may not be compatible with Catalina.

We recommend that you take note of any mission-critical software so you will have a list ready when the time comes to upgrade. Prior to upgrading in the future, if you are unsure your software will run in Catalina, you can submit a quick ticket with your software details so we can give you compatibility feedback.

Undoing a Hasty macOS Upgrade

There’s no easy way to undo the upgrade or simply roll it back. Reverting from Catalina to a previous version of macOS is an inconvenient process.  At best this would require we take your computer, erase your hard drive, reimage it, reinstall software, and restore your data and/or reconnect your OneDrive. Alternatively, it could require restoring your computer to its original factory settings. Of course, this means you won’t be able to use your computer while this is being done.

Once we are confident that Catalina will work well in our environment, ITS staff will be happy to assist with a safe and coherent upgrade process for our faculty and staff.